Study Groups

Industrial Relations as a field and Industrial Relations theory

Coordinators:

Prof Bruce KAUFMAN
Georgia State University
Department of Economics
ATLANTA, GA
USA
E-mail: bkaufman@gsu.edu

Gender and Employment

The Gender and Employment study group meets at ILERA regional and international conferences with the aim of bringing together ILERA members working and researching in the field of advancing gender equality at work. Our aim is to enable members to share policies, practices and research, build international networks of interest, and facilitate a place for exchange of ideas, theories and methodologies. The Gender and Employment study group also has as a main concern the need to ensure that ILERA conference structures, programs and activities reflect equal representation of genders.  The areas of research and practice that the Gender and Employment study group is interested in pursuing include, but are not limited to, polices and actions of governments, employers and unions, labour market patterns and segmentations, occupation and industry studies, discrimination and harassment at work, the crossover of paid work and unpaid work, and the gender division of labour in the home and at work. We have a strong interest in supporting PhD students, early career academics and practitioners, and sharing as widely as possible matters of contemporary relevance to the equality project. In 2021 the theme of our meeting will be ‘Gender, Work and COVID-19’. The Gender and Employment study groups is coordinated by Professors Marian Baird, Anne-Marie Greene and Gill Kirton.

Coordinators:

Prof. Anne-Marie GREENE
School of Business
University of Leicester
Leicester LE1 9BH
United Kingdom
Tel.: (+44-116) 257-7239
E-mail: ag485@leicester.ac.uk

Prof. Gill KIRTON
School of Business and Management
Queen Mary University of London
London E1 4NS
United Kingdom
Tel.: (+44-20) 7882-7439
Fax: (+44-20) 7882-3615
E-mail: g.kirton@qmul.ac.uk

Prof. Marian BAIRD
University of Sydney Business School
Australia
Tel.: (+61-2) 9351-6439
Fax: (+61-2) 9351-4729
E-mail: marian.baird@sydney.edu.au

Workers’ Participation

Workers’ Participation is ‘a process which allows employees to exert some influence over their work and the conditions under which they work’ (Strauss 1998).

This concept has various titles, including employee involvement, consultation, industrial democracy and employee voice. The variety of nomenclature indicates subtle differences in emphasis between the main objectives of:

  • sharing power between management and workers (industrial citizenship),
  • effective cooperation and communication in an organization to improve efficiency, and
  • individual employee empowerment, which in turn contributes to efficiency through raising employee morale and commitment (Walker 1976).

The social partners –employers, trade unions and government – have tended to emphasise different objectives, and to prefer different nomenclature. The nomenclature and dominant objectives of workers’ participation has also changed over time. Workers’ Participation includes various forms:

  • direct participation, through teamwork, self-managing teams, quality circles, workers’ assemblies consisting of all employees, and individual and collective exercise of job or task discretion or autonomy;
  • indirect or representative participation, through trade unions, works councils, joint consultative committees, occupational health and safety committees, and employee representation on boards;
  • self-management, including cooperatives and trade union enterprises;
  • financial participation, through profit sharing or employee share ownership; and
  • various combinations of these forms.

The Study Group is interested in encouraging research in all these forms of Workers’ Participation, and welcomes proposals for collaborative research, and offers of presentations at ILERA Congresses.

Two books have appeared from past collaborative projects, as well as numerous articles and reports. The books are:

  • R. Markey, P. Gollan, A. Hodgkinson, A. Chouraqui and U. Veersma (eds) (2001), Models of Participation in a Changing Global Environment: Diversity and Interaction, Ashgate, Aldershot; and
  • R. Markey and J. Monat (eds) (1997), Innovation and Employee Participation Through Works Councils: International Case Studies, Avebury, Aldershot.
Coordinators:

Prof. Raymond MARKEY
Centre for Workforce Futures
Faculty of Business and Economics
Macquarie University
North Ride NSW 2109
Australia
Tel.: +61 (0)2 9850 7444
E-mail: ray.markey@mq.edu.au

Public Policy and Industrial Relations

Who we are: The Study Group on Public Policy and Industrial Relations was formed early in ILERA’s history. Its intent is to create a caucus of scholars and practitioners interested in the development of labour policy in the public sphere. Our operating philosophy is that it is only through a dialogue among people with diverse views that we can develop new ideas and inform policy debates through those ideas that have been vetted thoroughly.

 What we do? Our group has met at every World Congress since the 1990s and at many of the Regional Congresses. Typically, we send out a Call for Papers (CFP) roughly 6-10 months in advance of each Congress to invite submissions. We meet for a half-day or a full-day during the Congress, depending on the number of papers presented.

The scope of our work is vast. Public policies that touch on any aspect of labour, employment, labour relations, labour standards, labour law, formal and informal labour markets, immigration, safety and health, social security, etc. are always included. Additionally, we call attention to specific themes from time to time. Themes of current interest include, among many others:

a.       Labour law reform to address gaps in protection of labour rights

b.       Labour policies to address globalization and its impact on labour

c.       Labour policies to ensure economic development with improving labour standards

d.       Labour policies to ensure Decent Work in informal labour markets

e.       Labour policies to ensure that new technologies lead to better working conditions

 Given our international and comparative focus, any work that compares policies and/or responses of the parties across two or more countries (or regions) is especially welcome.

 

oordinators:

Prof. Serafino NEGRELLI
Professor of Sociology of Work
Department of Sociology and Social Research
University of Milano Bicocca
Via Bicocca degli Arcimboldi 8
20126 Milano
Tel.: (+39-2) 6448-7555
Fax: (+39-2) 6448-7561
E-mail: serafino.negrelli@unimib.it

Prof. Anil VERMA
Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Ressources
Rotman School of Management
University of Toronto
105 St. George Street
Toronto, Ontario
M5S 3E6, Canada
Tel.: (+1-416) 978-5696
Fax: (+1-416) 978-5433
E-mail: verma@rotman.utoronto.ca

Flexible Work Patterns

Coordinators:

Dr Clare KELLIHER
Cranfield School of Management
Cranfield University,
BEDFORDSHIRE MK43 0AL
United Kingdom
E-mail: clare.kelliher@cranfield.ac.uk

Professor Richard CROUCHER
Middlesex University Business School
The Burroughs
Hendon
London NW4 4BT
United Kingdom
E-mail: R.Croucher@mdx.ac.uk

Professor Christine EDWARDS
Head, School of Human Resource Management
Kingston University Business School
Kingston Hill
KINGSTON-UPON-THAMES
SURREY KT2 7LB
United Kingdom
E-mail: c.edwards@kingston.ac.uk

Future of Trade Unionism

The study group on the Future of Trade Unionism began its activities in the liRA European Regional Conference in Helsinki 1994. Since then, the group members have met and presented papers at the liRA Conferences. In the lIRA World Congress in Bologna 1998, the group published then a very actual book on The Impact of EMU on Industrial Relations in European Union. Since that we have been following decentralisation of collective bargaining and lowering union membership numbers in many conferences. In the Sydney 2009 study group started discussion on industrial relations foresight. How industrial relations would look like in 2025? What would be situation in Australia, Brazil, China, India, Japan, South Africa, U.S. and in the European Union 27 Member Countries? The purpose of the analysis is to have better tmderstanding on global trends in industrial relations. What will be development in unionisation, collective bargaining content and negotiation levels? How worker participation is developing and what might be the future of industrial conflicts?

Coordinators:

Dr. Timo Kauppinen
Mantypaadentie 9A4
00830 Helsinki, Finland
Tel.: (+358-45) 2313-843
E-mail: timo.kauppinen43@gmail.com

Human Resource Management

The HRM Study Group of the ILERA invites expressions of interest to participate in the group’s activities. The HRM study group covers all aspects of human resource management. The objectives of the study group are:

  • To provide a forum for exchange for students, academics and practitioners to discuss issues related to human resource management theory and practice;
  • To develop a network to discuss issues related to the teaching of human resource management.
  • To cooperate with other academic and professional organisations in the field.

The study group intends to meet at all ILERA World congresses and as many regional and national congresses as possible. The study group meetings are in a seminar format and organised around a topical theme. For more information on meetings and on the study group’s activities in general, please visit: ILERA HRM Study Group

Anyone wishing to become a member of the study group is invited to contact one of the coordinators.

Call for papers “Global Value Chains and Labour Standards: Implications for Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management”

Coordinators:

Prof Dr Stefan ZAGELMEYER
Human Resource Management
Reader in Comparative and Int. Business
Alliance Manchester Business School
The University of Manchester
Booth Street East
Manchester M13 9SS
United Kingdom
E-mail: stefan.zagelmeyer@manchester.ac.uk

Prof Mark J. SMITH
Professor of Human Resource Management
Grenoble Ecole de Management
12 rue Pierre Sémard
38000 Grenoble
France
E-mail: mark.smith@grenoble-em.com

Research Methods in Industrial Relations

Those who investigate research methods define their area as that covering the processes and techniques of researching, and the theories and assumptions which underlie our choise of research methods. We are seeking to understand which methods and techniques of research can enable good scholarship in industrial relations. By exploring the nature and effectiveness research methods and techniques we can then begin to find ways of illuminating issues of process and method, and so improve our research.

This Study Group is seeking to develop a regular newsletter, and also to work more closely with other study groups. If you wish to join please contact one of the coordinators

Anyone wishing to become a member of the study group is invited to contact one of the coordinators.

Coordinators:

Prof. Diana KELLY
Director International Studies
University of Wollongong
WOLLONGONG NSW 2522
Australia
Tel.: (+61-2) 4221-3612
Fax: (+61-2) 4221-3425
E-mail: di_kelly@uow.edu.au

Prof. Keith WHITFIELD
Cardiff Business School
University of Wales
Colum Drive
CARDIFF CF1 3EU
United Kingdom
Tel.: (+44-29) 2087-4000
Fax: (+44-29) 2087-4419
E-mail: whitfield@cf.ac.uk

Industrial Relations in the Public Sector

Coordinators:

Prof. Stephen BACH
Professor of Employment Relations
Dept of Management,
King’s College
Franklin-Wilkins Building
150 Stamford Street
London SE1 9NH
Tel.: (+44-20) 7848-4090
E-mail: stephen.bach@kcl.ac.uk

Prof. Lorenzo BORDOGNA
Professor of Economic Sociology
Department of Labour and Welfaire Studies
Dipartimento di Studi del Lavoro
University of Milan
Via Conservatorio 7
I-20122 Italy
Tel.: (+39-02) 5032-1169
Fax: (+39-02) 5032-1167
E-mail: lorenzo.bordogna@unimi.it

Migration, with a specific focus on Labour Migration

The study group primary focus is on joint research and discourse, and the group meets at ILERA World and Regional Congresses. In between, it liaises through online discussion groups and seminars, and may consider joint publications and presentations. It is envisaged that the study group will foster understanding, primarily in the area of labour migration, and will draw on the experience and expertise of a range of specialists from different geographical, disciplinary and background/occupational contexts. It is intended to render a needed contribution to the ongoing and developing migration, and in particular labour migration, discourse in the world.

The scope of research and related activity of the study group is determined by the study group itself, on an ongoing basis. The study group engages with typical challenges, topical developments and specific phenomena associated with labour migration in particular. There is an emphasis on developing and changing contours, critical reflection on trends and fundamental questions, and a study of developments and responses. It is specifically envisaged that critical areas, which are either inadequately addressed, or not addressed at all, by way of scientific analysis and discourse, and engagement with practitioners, will be particularly investigated, including among others:

  • Social protection of migrant workers
  • Normative basis relating to the protection of migrant workers – for example, in terms of traditional standards and approaches (emanating from the ILO, UN and IOM, among others) vis-à-vis the impact of trade agreement-related obligations imposed on states
  • Country-of-origin measures to extend care and protection to their own migrant workers, in the wake of inadequate international standards and developing state practice
  • Role of bilateral and multilateral agreements to regulate migration flows and protection, including labour law and social protection of migrant workers and their families
  • Diaspora engagement
  • Remittance flows, uses and linkages with labour migration
  • Changing frameworks in relation to recruitment

The methodology employed primarily involves comparative analysis and discourse, in order to learn from different experiences and approaches, preferably of a multi-disciplinary nature, which would include, for purposes of enhancing comparative work, foundational and country/regional perspectives. This study group is open to any person with an interest or involvement in migration, in particular labour migration, and involvement of interested persons from both the global south and the global north is encouraged.

Coordinators:

Prof. Marius Olivier
Adjunct-Professor, School of Law
University of Western Australia
Perth, Australia
E-mail: olivier@iislp.net.au
Extraordinary Professor
Faculty of Law
Northwest University
Potchefstroom, South Africa
E-mail: olivier@isl-p.org

Prof. Avinash Govindjee
Executive Dean
Faculty of Law
Nelson Mandela University
Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Visiting Professor
National Law School of India University
Bangalore, India
E-mail: avinash.govindjee@mandela.ac.za

Prof. Evance Kalula
Director: International Academic Programmes Office (IAPO)
University of Cape Town
South Africa
Past President: ILERA
E-mail: evance.kalula@uct.ac.za

Prof. Gijsbert Vonk,
Professor of Labour and Social Security Law
Faculty of Law
University of Groningen, Netherlands
E-mail: g.j.vonk@rug.nl

Social Protection

 The study group plans to explore how different modalities to advance the achievement of social protection are emerging in different parts of the world, including through country studies, regional- and continental-focused work, and by investigating the role of international standards. The study group focuses primarily on joint research and discourse, and meets in person at ILERA World and Regional Congresses. The group also liaises through online discussion groups and seminars, and may consider joint publications and presentations. The study group draws on expertise from a range of different contexts in order to provide a sound platform for future (and ongoing) collaboration and the exchange and publication of innovative research in order to address the significant social protection challenges experienced globally.

Following the approach of various global agencies, countries and regions, issues directly related to the labour market (including matters such as public works programmes, employment guarantee schemes, skills development activities and other matters associated with employability) and to the extension of social security to workers in the informal sector are specifically included as part of the scope. Other possible focus areas include, but are not restricted to, issues of coverage and access, the inter-relationship between social protection and the plight of migrant workers, and social protection in ageing societies.

 Participants’ work may be grounded in a range of disciplines including law, economics, finance, taxation, public administration, human resources, social development, politics and history. It is expected that the activities of the group will contribute in advancing the frontiers of knowledge in areas such as social assistance, social insurance, employment guarantee schemes and public works programmes, and that reforms designed to enhance social protection will be proposed. In this way it is hoped that the work of the study group will address pressing socio-economic challenges such as unemployment and inequality, utilising a variety of approaches and methodologies. Scholars focusing on international, regional, comparative and institutional dimensions of social protection are particularly encouraged to contribute to the work of the study group, as are academics and policy makers from the developing world. 

Coordinators:

Prof. Avinash Govindjee
Executive Dean
Faculty of Law
Nelson Mandela University
Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Visiting Professor
National Law School of India University
Bangalore, India
E-mail: avinash.govindjee@mandela.ac.za

Prof. Marius Olivier
Adjunct-Professor, School of Law
University of Western Australia
Perth, Australia
E-mail: olivier@iislp.net.au
Extraordinary Professor
Faculty of Law
Northwest University
Potchefstroom, South Africa
E-mail: olivier@isl-p.org

 Prof. Evance Kalula
Director: International Academic Programmes Office (IAPO)
University of Cape Town
South Africa
Past President: ILERA
E-mail: evance.kalula@uct.ac.za

Prof. Gijsbert Vonk,
Professor of Labour and Social Security Law
Faculty of Law
University of Groningen, Netherlands
E-mail: g.j.vonk@rug.nl

Labour Adjudication, Arbitration & Mediation

The study group is open to everyone interested and involved in labour and employment dispute resolution, adjudication, arbitration, mediation-arbitration, conciliation and mediation.

For all disputes in the labour and employment field, whether at an international level (over employment standards, over labour agreements as part of trade agreements), at a national level (between confederations of trade unions and employers), at a regional or sectoral level (between trades, trade union federations and employer associations), at an enterprise or plant level (between trade unions and particular employers), or between individual employees and individual employers, there are methods used to resolve those disputes. If the parties cannot resolve the dispute themselves they will be assisted by a third party, either a court, a state agency or an agreed private resolution mechanism. The resolution is either binding and determinative, or advisory, or facilitative. The study group explores all of the different ways, the different institutions, and the different techniques used to achieve effective resolution of such disputes.

The study group is interested in comparative differences in the methods of dispute resolution, and in the varieties of institutions in different countries that are utilized to achieve settlement of labour and employment disputes.

The study group explores how different dispute resolution methods and techniques are utilized to advance expedited dispute resolution, e.g. how mediation and arbitration or adjudication are combined to reduce costs and to achieve optimal settlement of disputes.

The study group aims to bring together labour court judges, labour tribunal adjudicators and labour and employment arbitrators, conciliators and mediators from different countries to engage together on issues of mutual interest: including expedited procedures, substantive jurisprudence in labour and employment, the uses of mediation, mediation-arbitration, human rights adjudication, and remedies, among other topics.

The research carried out on the basis of these themes aims to foster closer relations among colleagues engaged in the field of labour and employment dispute resolution, and to promote comparative understanding of the institutions, structures and mechanisms for dispute resolution in different countries. Through the interaction on the study group, lessons learned from other countries may offer fresh insights into the scope and possibilities of domestic dispute resolution.

Coordinators:

The Chair of the International Studies Committee of the National Academy of Arbitrators
Current Chair: Christopher Albertyn
Albertyn Arbitration Inc.
54 Fairleigh Crescent
Toronto, Ontario M6C 3R9
Canada
Tel.: +1 (647) 223-6202
E-mail: chrisalbertyn@icloud.com
Website: www.albertyn.ca